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PROOF: Trampolines Improve Co-Ordination in Kids & Adults

Trampolines have been a popular recreational activity for many years, providing an enjoyable and exciting way to exercise and have fun.

Many people believe that trampolining can help to improve coordination, but is there any scientific evidence to support this claim?

In this article, we will explore the research on trampolining and coordination to determine whether or not there is any proof that using a trampoline can improve your coordination.

Firstly, it is important to understand what is meant by coordination. Coordination is the ability to move different parts of the body in a smooth and efficient manner, allowing us to perform tasks that require precision and accuracy. This could include activities such as throwing a ball, playing an instrument, or even walking.

There are many factors that can influence coordination, including genetics, age, and environmental factors. However, there is some evidence to suggest that certain types of physical activity, including trampolining, could have a positive impact on coordination.

One study published in the Journal of Motor Behavior in 2014 investigated the effects of trampolining on coordination in a group of children aged between 9 and 11 years old.

The study found that after just six weeks of trampoline training, the children demonstrated improvements in a range of coordination tasks, including balance, rhythm, and timing. The researchers suggested that trampolining could be an effective tool for improving coordination in children.

Another study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness in 2016 investigated the effects of trampoline training on balance and coordination in a group of young adults.

The study found that after six weeks of trampoline training, the participants demonstrated significant improvements in both balance and coordination. The researchers suggested that trampoline training could be an effective way to improve these skills in adults.

While these studies provide some evidence to suggest that trampolining can improve coordination, it is important to consider the limitations of the research. For example, both studies had relatively small sample sizes, meaning that the results may not be representative of the wider population. Additionally, both studies focused on short-term changes in coordination, rather than long-term improvements.

To gain a better understanding of the long-term effects of trampolining on coordination, a more extensive study was conducted by researchers at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK. This study involved a group of 52 children aged between 6 and 8 years old, who were divided into two groups. One group received 10 weeks of trampoline training, while the other group received no training.

After the 10-week period, the researchers found that the trampoline training group demonstrated significant improvements in a range of coordination tasks, including jumping and balancing. These improvements were maintained six weeks after the training had ended, suggesting that trampolining could have long-term benefits for coordination.

Another study, published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2012, investigated the effects of trampoline training on coordination and balance in a group of elderly women.

The study found that after 12 weeks of trampoline training, the participants demonstrated significant improvements in both coordination and balance, suggesting that trampolining could be a useful tool for maintaining these skills in older age.

It is worth noting that trampolining, like any form of physical activity, carries some risks. There is a risk of injury associated with trampolining, particularly if proper safety precautions are not taken. Common injuries associated with trampolining include sprains, fractures, and head injuries.

To minimize the risk of injury, it is important to ensure that the trampoline is set up and used correctly, with appropriate safety measures in place. This could include using a safety net or enclosure, ensuring that the trampoline is placed on a flat and level surface, and providing appropriate supervision

Additionally, it is important to note that trampolining may not be suitable for everyone. People with certain health conditions, such as back problems or balance disorders, may need to avoid trampolining. It is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new physical activity, including trampolining.

Despite the potential risks, trampolining can be a fun and effective way to improve coordination, balance, and other physical skills. It is also a great form of exercise that can provide cardiovascular benefits and help to build strength and endurance.

In addition to the research discussed above, there are also anecdotal reports from trampoline enthusiasts who claim that regular trampolining has helped to improve their coordination and other physical skills. Many people enjoy the challenge of mastering new trampoline skills, such as flips and twists, which require a high degree of coordination and control.

Trampolining can also be a social activity, providing an opportunity to exercise and have fun with friends and family. This can help to promote feelings of wellbeing and improve mental health.

SUMMARY

In conclusion, there is some evidence to suggest that using a trampoline can improve coordination, particularly in children and older adults. However, it is important to consider the limitations of the research, and to ensure that proper safety measures are in place when using a trampoline. People with certain health conditions may also need to avoid trampolining.

Overall, trampolining can be a fun and effective way to improve physical skills and promote wellbeing. If you are considering trampolining as a form of exercise, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional and to ensure that appropriate safety measures are in place.