SAVE €30 Code: may30 (over €400) +Free 48HR Delivery (€400+)

At What Age is It Safe for Kids to Begin Using Trampolines?

Trampolines are an enjoyable and popular activity among children of all ages. However, parents often question what the best age is for their children to start using trampolines.

While trampolines can provide numerous benefits such as

  • physical exercise,
  • improved coordination, and
  • socialization.

There are also potential risks and safety concerns that must be considered.

In this article, we will examine the best age for children to begin using trampolines based on expert recommendations and research.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children under the age of six should not use trampolines, and children between the ages of six and 17 should only use trampolines with adult supervision.

This recommendation is based on data showing that children under six years of age are at a higher risk of injury due to their

  • limited motor skills and balance, and
  • lack of impulse control.

Additionally, younger children have a higher risk of serious injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head injuries due to their developing bones and weaker musculature.

The AAP also notes that many injuries occur when multiple children are jumping on the trampoline at the same time.

A study published in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics examined trampoline-related injuries in children under the age of six. The study found that 48.3% of injuries occurred in children under the age of six and that fractures were the most common injury, accounting for 35.9% of all injuries. The study concluded that children under six should not use trampolines due to the high risk of injury.

Children between the ages of six and 17 can use trampolines but should be closely supervised by an adult.

Injuries in this age group are less common but can still occur. A study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma found that children aged 5-18 years accounted for 92% of trampoline-related fractures. The study also found that the most common fractures were of the upper extremities, accounting for 42% of all injuries. The study recommended that children should use trampolines under adult supervision and with only one child jumping at a time.

It is also important to note that trampolines are not recommended for children with certain medical conditions, such as spinal cord injuries, muscular dystrophy, and Down syndrome. These children may have weaker bones or a higher risk of injury due to their medical condition.

Trampolines can provide several benefits to children, such as physical exercise, improved coordination, and socialization. A study published in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine found that trampoline training can improve coordination and balance in children, which can have long-term benefits for their motor skills development. Additionally, trampoline use can provide a fun and engaging way for children to exercise, which can help combat the rise of childhood obesity.

When choosing a trampoline, it is important to consider safety features. The AAP recommends using a trampoline with safety netting, padding, and a frame that is sturdy and rust-free. Additionally, the trampoline should be placed on a level surface and away from trees, fences, and other potential hazards.

In summary, children under six years of age should not use trampolines, and children between the ages of six and 17 should only use trampolines with adult supervision.

While trampolines can provide numerous benefits such as physical exercise, improved coordination, and socialization, there are also potential risks and safety concerns that must be considered. It is important to choose a trampoline with safety features, and children with certain medical conditions should not use trampolines.

References:

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2012). Trampoline safety in childhood and adolescence. Pediatrics, 130(4), 774-779.

Goldberg, A., & Cimino, W. (2019). Trampolines. Pediatrics in Review, 40(10), 509-512.

Hennrikus, W., & Gauger, C. (2014). Trampoline-related injuries in children: A review of the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. Pediatric Emergency Care, 30(12), 951-955.

Kerr, Z. Y., & Pierpoint, L. A. (2019). Trampoline injury trends in the United States: 2000-2014. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, 39(8), e603-e609.

Lai, C. C., Tu, Y. K., Huang, Y. H., Hsu, Y. C., Su, F. C., & Chen, W. M. (2019). Balance and jumping performance of youth athletes: A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of trampoline training and taekwondo practice. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 18(3), 485-493.

Schmitz, M. R., Spooner, A. L., & Giordano, B. D. (2017). Pediatric trampoline injuries. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, 31(Suppl 4), S11-S14.

Smith, G. A., Shields, B. J., & eds. (2012). Trampoline-related injuries to children: A pediatric trauma surgeon's perspective. Springer Science & Business Media.

Webb, M. J., & Wolfenden, S. A. (2018). Trampolines: A risk for injury or a useful therapeutic tool? Physical Therapy Reviews, 23(4), 223-229.